Operator Systems | New report from Frost & Sulivan Focuses
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-17431,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1200,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-11.1,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.1.1,vc_responsive

New report from Frost & Sulivan Focuses

Frost & Sullivan has released a new report – Factories of the Future.


What will future factories and plants look like? Will they be radically different or will they simply be extensions of what we see today? How will they be organized and managed? What role will new technologies play? Will people still be important?

Thinking about the future isn’t just an intellectual exercise performed after normal business hours. It’s a business necessity, and a prudent one at that. The future is always coming at us, and sometimes it arrives faster than we expect. In business, the competitive landscape can change quickly in any market if trends are not seen and understood. The smart business executive must manage both today and tomorrow with the right balance of focus and emphasis—acharge that is often easier said than done.

Many of the long-term, transformational trends under way in the manufacturing industry today—the shift to build to order, the digitization of business and production processes, the desire for greater speed and agility throughout the business—are reflected in the new survey’s results. These trends portend a future in which factories and plants are highly automated, staffed with computer-literate people who have a penchant for collaboration, and where the “Perfect Order” is the rule not the exception.

But the survey also reveals that, despite the business need to focus on and plan for the future, the past year’s economic and business climate—in which a slowdown in manufacturing output growth and a renewed loss of jobs occurred— can result in a distraction from that important activity. In a troubling finding, just over a quarter of survey respondents said that they are now more focused on current needs than planning ahead five to 10 years, a nearly 10-point jump from the nearly 16 percent who said last year that they were preoccupied with the here and now.

Link: Frost & Sullivan

No Comments

Post A Comment

sixteen + 9 =